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The Fate of Ireland's Founders by Kimanda The Fate of Ireland's Founders by Kimanda
Well, not really founders, eponyms rather. ^^; Basically, both characters are credited with giving Ireland his name. Spot the false one!

... Honestly, it is a given that it is the goddess Eriú who gave her name to Ireland. Ireland's native name is "Éire" after all. The guy Ír is mentioned way later but it is interesting that he is basically in the same story as Eriú. And I thought it was interesting that a male eponym existed at all, as male representations of Ireland are traditionally inexistant.

Short summary of the story: Ireland was, according to legends, invaded 5 times. The ancestors of the Irish, named Milesians, were the 5th invasion. (Milesians came from Iberia, their name was based on their founder Míl Espáine, which means "Soldier of Spain") The Tuatha Dé Danann (Child/People of Danu) were the 4th invasion.
Before the invasion of the Milesians, the Tuatha Dé Danann were fighting over something (can't remember what) and it attracted the attention of the Milesians. Concerned, they sent Íth who was their ambassador to Ireland to ease the tension. The Tuatha Dé Danann grew scared over how well Íth was able to express himself with words and so they killed him. That made the Milesians angry and they invaded.
But the Tuatha Dé Danann, being gods and goddesses, used the elements of the island to bring up storms and make the sea very dangerous. One Milesian, named Ír, came with one boat closer to Ireland and managed to set a foot on the island. But the Tuatha Dé Danann used strong winds that shoved Ír over the cliff and back into the sea, subsequently drowning him.
However, other Milesians got nearer to Ireland and managed to land. One of their poets recited an Irish poem and using the power of the words, the storms disappeared and the Tuatha Dé Danann lost their control over the elements of Ireland.
Fighting was quick and bloody. The Milesians and the Tuatha Dé Danann clashed together and many were killed in the struggle. Even Eriú's husband was killed. Later on, Eriú approached the army of Milesians and praised them as the greatest men in the world. Impressed by her words, they asked what she wanted in return. She requested to be named after the island and her wish was granted.
Didn't stop the Milesians from gathering her, her sisters and all the other royal members of the Tuatha Dé Danann together and executing them.

Bet you didn't know that Eriú was married to a man named Mac Gréine, hmm? (his name means "Son of Sun") Also, she was a mother. She had one son named Bres who grew into a tyrannical king. Oh and it is mentioned that she also had an affair. Well, we can't say Eriú was a boring goddess.

Sorry for the huge text, it seemed worthwhile telling you guys about the two characters who are connected by name to Ireland. Ireland doesn't seem overly pleased at having to choose between an executed eponym or a drowned eponym.
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:icongeranger:
Geranger Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2012
The text is very interesting. There are many metaphors in the story. Maybe Irish language was greatly influenced by Milesians' language? (It seems the Milesians had higher degree in language, since "the Tuatha Dé Danann grew scared over how well Íth was able to express himself with words"... )

Ireland has a bloody history. Guess I should go read some books first OTZ
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:iconkimanda:
Kimanda Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2012
It is very interesting! ^^ But mind you, the Milesians are not real, they were an invention for the story of how Ireland was conquered by the mortal men from the ancient gods. However, some have said that the battle between the Milesians and the Tuatha Dé Danann is a metaphor of a forgotten memory. The battle ended with the Tuatha Dé Danann being made to live beneath the mounds and when you look at those mounds, a lot of them are non-Celtic burial mounds. The story seems to refer to the Milesians being the Celts and the Tuatha Dé Danann being the people who didn't have a Celtic culture. (original inhabitants of Ireland perhaps?) The language aspect of the story may refer to the high significance language and literature had in Irish society, the Irish really took words seriously. They were terrified of using the real name of the wolf, so they created a fake name and it is the fake name that survived. :XD:

Ireland has a bloody history but also a very twisted and confusing one. Which makes it all the more fascinating for me. ^^
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:iconkattkins:
Kattkins Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2012  Student General Artist
Cool! I didn't know that about Ireland. ^^
The story is really intruiguing, and it kinda shows how history can be slightly fuzzy round the edges the further back one looks.
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:iconkimanda:
Kimanda Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2012
Ireland has a lot of hidden corners, even I am constantly making new discoveries. (which of course makes me happy, I love gathering new knowledge :D)
The story is quite long, as you'd imagine with five mythical invasions and the story itself is already complicated. Might get around to converting the story into episodic pictures? I'll see what I can do.
Oh yes, Ireland's history gets really fuzzy the further you go. I even discovered that the Irish originally referred to themselves as "Féni" before the word "Gael" became more widespread. (the word "Gael" actually was given by the Britons to the Irish who lived in Britain)
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:iconkattkins:
Kattkins Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2012  Student General Artist
Ah yes, the pursuit of knowledge is a wonderful thing~
I bet it is! 5 invasions, with mythology added into the mix almost makes it an epic tale! The idea of episodic pictures sounds good!
Wow, really? That's cool! That's a very interesting fact. I didn't know that.
I know some stories from wales, which are interesting. (I have a story book of old tales, including the "legend of Gelert", and "you mustn't see the fairies". XD)
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:iconkimanda:
Kimanda Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2012
The thirst of knowledge should never be quenched!
Since all 5 invasions are mythical, I'm trying to track down the tribes that would have made up the Irish identity. Here is some of my musing: [link]
Oh, I know the "legend of Gelert"! Such a sad story, I remember feeling quite sad for the dog. I don't think I know the second story you mentioned, even though I have a mammoth book on Celtic myths. ^^
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:iconkattkins:
Kattkins Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2012  Student General Artist
Yes!
Wow. That's a lot of musing. It makes a lot of sense, you've set it out in a really informative way. It makes me wonder how, in a couple of centuries, people will think of our modern era. While we have far more records, our languges are still shifting, which could later play a part in clouding the transition from separate cultures into one large melting-pot.

Ah, "You mustn't see the fairies" is about a girl who served at a house, and on nights when the moon was full, she'd go out and apprently dance by herself. When asked, she said she was dancing with the "twyleth teg" (fair folk, the fairies). Eventually, she leaves the house, and later the lady of the house (who's a midwife) is asked to come to help with the birth of a baby. She's told to put a drop of a strange liquid in the babie's eyes, but not to get any in hers. She manages to rub some in her right eye, and she starts to see the fairies and can resist their 'glamour'. She later meets a fairy, who tells her "you mustn't see the fairies, dame", then he touches her right eye with a twig and vanishes.
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:iconkimanda:
Kimanda Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012
I tend to muse a lot, it was difficult for me to keep that short even. It could have been even longer but I told myself I was going to keep it short. I love gathering new knowledge and I also like sharing that knowledge with those who are interested. It is interesting to consider how the future generations will regard us. I do wonder how much praise we'll get and how many heads will be shaken at some of the things we've done. It would be really cool to see how our future will be.

Oh, oh, I think I know the story then! But I have no idea where I've read the story, I read so many of them that I am starting to lose track of them. ^^;
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:iconkattkins:
Kattkins Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012  Student General Artist
Sharing what we know is one of the greatest things we as individuals can do.
I hope that future generations will live in a more accepting world, since the world we live in seems to be heading that way. However, there are still things which seem terrible, and I can't believe people do such things.

Ah, it is a really good story. It's near the top of my list of myths, alongside the one about King Arthur sleeping in an unknown hill in the mountains of Wales. There's something really mysterious about the celtic myths, more so than the later english ones, at least.
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:iconkimanda:
Kimanda Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012
Indeed!
Yeah, we are moving towards a more accepting world but I think we have to be careful in maintaining it because we do have sadly a lot of extremist factions. They are put in a position of power in a country, they'll set that country back by a few generations. It is sad that some horrible things still happen when we really should know better.

I think most of my favourites are Irish stories, though there are some Scottish stories that I really like as well. If I had to pick from the Welsh stories, I'd say I enjoyed "Bran and Branwen" and "Math Fab Mathonwy" the most. Of course I would love to get my hands on more Welsh stories, I am thoroughly fascinated by Celtic legends. One book described them as having a sense of mischievous fun just beneath the surface.
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